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Philosopher's Holiday Lecture Series: Jay Elliot

Jay Elliott, Bard College “Aristotle on the Voluntariness of Vice” Can people who have been raised with false moral views be held responsible for their bad character? Philosophers have often assumed that they cannot, on the grounds that their character was never really "up to them." In this talk, I argue that Aristotle provides a compelling case for rejecting this assumption and holding that the moral views we get from our upbringing are in fact up to us in the only sense that matters. March 1st at 5:15pm, Rockefeller Hall 200

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Journal of Philosophy Call For Papers

The Vassar College Journal of Philosophy is a student-run publication supported by the Philosophy Department of Vassar College. Dedicated to both quality and accessibility, it seeks to give undergraduate students from all disciplines a platform to express and discuss philosophical ideas. All those interested in contributing an essay to the issue of the Journal to be published in the Spring of 2017 are invited to review the submission guidelines listed below. Every issue of the Journal has an overall theme. Submissions ranging across a variety of topics are welcome as long as they can be related to that theme, which this year is “Action.”

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New course description for PHIL 105-02 Philosophical Questions (Sofia Ortiz-Hinojosa)

This course is an introduction to some major themes in the philosophical tradition. To warm up we will start by discussing the existence of God, the problem of evil, and the case for religious belief. We will then move on to problems in the study of knowledge. Is there an external world? How do we we know about what there is outside of ourselves? Are there scientific laws? We will then talk about what kinds of creatures we are: is my 5-year-old self the same as my adult self? At what point do I cease to be the same person? And - are the kinds of creatures we are imbued with free will? We will end by discussing what it means for something to be good for us. The main purpose of the course will be to build up philosophical skills, pass on useful philosophical tools, and enable students to tackle difficult topics in writing and group discussion. Emphasis will be placed on the reading and interpretation of primary texts and their application to contemporary debates in the field of philosophy. Sofia Ortiz-Hinojosa.

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